Oct. 11th, 2015

varjohaltia: (Fitengli)
While this novel is oddly part of two series, continuing the adventures of gunnery sergeant Torin Kerr of the Confederation Marines, it can stand on its own as well, as the setting is pretty familiar science fiction trope territory.

The genre is space opera on an individual scale; the action isn't space fleet battles as much as boots on the ground in the dirt. It's feel-good pop-corn reading; the eminently competent sergeant Kerr is thrown into any number of dicy situations and manages to get herself and most of her people back out of them, showing integrity and honor and all the romanticized values of a military in the process.

The above shouldn't be taken to imply this book isn't good. Ms. Huff continues to deliver the tropy feel-good romp with great skill. Everything is just a notch above what one would expect: the characters, while by no means deep, are interesting and sympathetic and different; the world building feels natural; while the protagonist manages to overcome the plot challenges elegantly enough to satisfy Hollywood sensibilities, a lot of politics and morality and big picture setting somehow still manages to come through.

The basic plot: A group of grave robbers are about to unearth ancient weapons from one of the Elder Races, and it's up to Kerr and her no-longer-marines company to stop them before their actions can cause another war. The plot pacing isn't perfect; a lot of the book is a dungeon crawl with one group following the other, and consequently covering some of the same ground. While this allows for comparison between the motivations of the two groups it still felt a bit annoying. The story follows multiple viewpoints as needed in chronological order, and it flows very naturally. The prose is good, albeit not extraordinary.

In summary — if you want a competent, tough-but-good idealized version of a space marine leading a motley crew of races on a romp for justice, this is a book for you.

Three and a half out of five.
varjohaltia: (Fitengli)
This contains some possible spoilers of the previous two books.

Brief recap of the concept and some of the tech assumptions of Leckie's world: AI exists, humans can have implants that allow them to communicate with, or be completely controlled by said AI, war ships have a number of such humans, called ancillaries, at their disposal; they're individual intelligences and consciousnesses, but synchronized as parts of a greater whole. There's an interstellar empire that is keeping peace by conquest, ruled by one apparently immortal empress. A few alien races exist, but they're alien, and generally keep to themselves as do the humans.

The protagonist is one of these ancillaries; after the destruction of her ship, her part of the AI is all that remained. While this book plot-wise can largely stand on its own, it really should be read as part of the trilogy, since the protagonist's nature and relation to her crew are otherwise left less explored than it should. Notably, the use of gendered pronouns when referring to an artificial intelligence was intentionally muddied in the first book; by this third volume any assumptions of the accuracy, relevance or meaning of sex or gender should not be taken at face value.

The plot continues from where it left off at the second book — the empress consists of multiple clones, and they've unsychronized and are now waging war amongst themselves. The premise is dicy: arguably the current system of rule isn't perfect and might makes right instinctively doesn't sit well with the reader or the protagonist, but even beyond that all the loyal subjects of the empire are asked to pick a side, even when they just want to be loyal to the concept or system, and since all the sides are supposedly the legitimate authority, the choice is impossible.

We learn more about the Presger aliens, and this is generally that they are alien. Leckie does a good job at making aliens, their behavior and motives alien.

The themes familiar from the previous works continue here — trying to find the right choice, trying to decide what is just, navigating class and religion and fallible and imperfect people, as well as exploring the nature of the AIs in more depth. Between the three books concepts such as identity, self-determination, end justifying the means, ones responsibility to oneself and others are pretty well examined.

There's action as well, and the novel works well as space opera, but the added aspects really elevate the entire series a notch above even good space opera.

The pacing is good, the prose competent — while it might not be most elaborate writing on its surface, there's a clear level of consideration that has gone into it.

Four out of five

While this "concludes the trilogy," there's room for future exploration of the universe, and I'd definitely welcome it.

Profile

varjohaltia: (Default)
varjohaltia

October 2015

S M T W T F S
    123
4 5678910
11121314151617
18 192021222324
25262728293031

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Jul. 24th, 2017 12:29 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios